Safety

 

Eric S. Safety@eshog.com

Safety Officer

Eric S.

[email protected]

Riding Signals

You’re on a group ride. Who can initiate riding signals?

You’re in the middle of the pack and no one ahead gave a signal to indicate a problem in the road. Can you suddenly give a riding signal to warn those behind you, or is there simply a feeling that experienced riders know enough to avoid silly little issues in the road? After all, if the group in front could handle it, who are you to suggest the riders toward the rear are any less experienced?

Often times ride leaders make assumptions about the experience and skill level of the group. A good example is when the ride has section after section of twisty road. The leader may not hold up one finger each time entering such a section, and two fingers when exiting. You should feel empowered to hold up one finger at the point you feel others are encroaching on your safety margin. If you don’t feel you have control of the lane, which enables you to avoid obstacles appearing in the middle of the corner, then be sure to raise the correct single finger to let others behind you know to give you the space you need.

The objective of group riding signals is to warn others of impending risks and to maintain a margin of safety for each rider in the group. Ideally, the rider leader went through their range of riding signals regarding risks in the road, discussing situations when each might be used, or not used, during the pre-ride discussion. Myself, I let the group know, for safety reasons, every time we enter a twisty section where you cannot see at least four seconds of the road ahead, it’s single file. Exit and you can ride a staggered formation. It’s my way; it may not be your way. If on my ride, and you feel compelled to put up a finger, do it.

As for the riding signals needed to maintain a safety margin, those come with experience.

If on any group ride and you feel compelled to warn others of a real or perceived risk when no one else ahead bothered, or to maintain your margins of safety, do it.Riding Signals

You’re on a group ride. Who can initiate riding signals?

You’re in the middle of the pack and no one ahead gave a signal to indicate a problem in the road. Can you suddenly give a riding signal to warn those behind you, or is there simply a feeling that experienced riders know enough to avoid silly little issues in the road? After all, if the group in front could handle it, who are you to suggest the riders toward the rear are any less experienced?

Often times ride leaders make assumptions about the experience and skill level of the group. A good example is when the ride has section after section of twisty road. The leader may not hold up one finger each time entering such a section, and two fingers when exiting. You should feel empowered to hold up one finger at the point you feel others are encroaching on your safety margin. If you don’t feel you have control of the lane, which enables you to avoid obstacles appearing in the middle of the corner, then be sure to raise the correct single finger to let others behind you know to give you the space you need.

The objective of group riding signals is to warn others of impending risks and to maintain a margin of safety for each rider in the group. Ideally, the rider leader went through their range of riding signals regarding risks in the road, discussing situations when each might be used, or not used, during the pre-ride discussion. Myself, I let the group know, for safety reasons, every time we enter a twisty section where you cannot see at least four seconds of the road ahead, it’s single file. Exit and you can ride a staggered formation. It’s my way; it may not be your way. If on my ride, and you feel compelled to put up a finger, do it.

As for the riding signals needed to maintain a safety margin, those come with experience.

If on any group ride and you feel compelled to warn others of a real or perceived risk when no one else ahead bothered, or to maintain your margins of safety, do it.

Safety article archive

Spring Training

Reflections

Toilet Paper

Traffic detectors are your friend

Safety Margins

The road taken for granted

Riding Signals

Riding tips

Riding in the rain

T-CLOCS pre-ride inspection check list

Group Riding Staggered Formation

Group Parking

State motorcycle
information

Safe Rider skills

Motorcycle resource sheet

Riding courses

The Harley Davidson New Rider Course

Motorcycle Safety Training Schools and Courses*

* Provided for a courtesy, not endorsed by Harley Davidson or HOG